What is the Future of the Atlantic Fleet?

VSXY Virgin Atlantic Airways Airbus A330-343X taken 04-05-2011 at ...If I was honest I would say that I do not believe we need any more fleet aircraft carriers and that it would be better to reduce the number of big deck carriers in favor of a more flexible fleet. This especially applies to the Atlantic Fleet, which really does not seem to have any real opposition. In South America there are no real hostile forces that we should be overly concerned about. In truth we could not currently foresee any need for overt military action by large forces, either at sea or on land or even in the Air.

In Africa there are many problems, but not many problems which can be solved by a large carrier fleet. Amphibious assault ships and small deck helicopters are the resources that might be required in any likely events there. For example the most pressing problem which might require our intervention is AQIM or Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb. They are in fact a bunch of maniacs running around the Sahara desert in Toyota pickup trucks. They are a big problem regionally, but the Europeans are the ones who should be taking the lead in trying to solve it and we can provide all the resources we need with little Naval involvement.

Europe itself is not under a real threat from any viable Naval power and if they were it is time that they learned to pay for their own defense bills. The only negative impact for us is upon Defense Contractors and those guys need to start thinking about problems which effect this country. We have limited resources and the Europeans are a wealthy and advanced group of Nations with their own taxpayers. I would have to say that I do not think we have the proper types of fleet assets needed for the Atlantic or many other areas. I think the situation is like the onset of WWII when the Royal Navy had all of these big shiny battleships, but was completely lacking in escort ships for the war they ended up fighting.

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